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The Way Jim and Jeannie Gaffigan found Humor during a crisis.

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No Joke

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Last year, the comedian Jim Gaffigan and his writer wife, Jeannie, faced a health problem that threatened to end Jeannie’s life, destroyed their marriage, and even halted his career. However, innovative technology — along with Humor, made them through.

Jim is a well-known comedian. However, forget about his films, late-night appearances, and stand-up shows, then you’ll find that the Gaffigan family is just like the other loving, though a little frantic, big family. Jim and his partner Jeannie (in marriage and material, she’s a producer, writer, and often collaborates) manage five kids, jokes, and insane schedules. They try their best to avoid dropping any ball, not primarily in regards in regards to health.

When Jeannie suffered from crushing headaches, often falling, and intense fatigue in the closing months of 2016, she chalked it all up to life. The mother-of-three realized I didn’t have enough time to deal with this! “I thought I was suffering from influenza,” she says.

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Her children’s pediatrician signaled a red flag during a routine visit. This is when you consider “routine” an appointment in April last year with five kids, including three boys and two daughters (now), ranging from 4-to 13.

When she noticed her coughing, the doctor shifted her focus to the Gaffigan family and their mom, who could not hear anything from her left ear. A quick examination revealed no signs of inflammation, and she recommended Jeannie immediately visit an ear, nose, and throat (ENT) specialist.

She obliged. She didn’t think about it. She never thought she’d be taken to a major surgery just a couple of days later, with a terrified Jim by her close.

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It all happened in a flash. It was a matter of time before the ENT requested an MRI exam of Jeannie’s brain and found a 6-centimeter tumor as big as a tennis ball that was rising inside the tightly enclosed space in the stem of her brain. Although it later proved harmless, its size and position were hazardous. If it had been left unchecked just a little longer, the patient would have experienced difficulties in thinking and recalling and paralysis, and likely death, according to the doctor who treated her, Joshua Bederson, MD, in Mount Sinai Hospital New York.

“We were able to inform our two children about the situation since we were aware that the family was likely to be radically disrupted,” Jim says in an email in his room at the hotel two hours before when his comedy show on stage in New Orleans. “So we did the same thing that doctors did to us: they presented the facts with the positive, glass-half-full approach” despite his actual levels of fear, which he admits was far from the norm.

Tumor Humor

The Gaffigan’s managed to get over their fear with numerous prayers and an action plan that included going to Mount Sinai’s emergency department after finding out that the top surgeon Bederson was a patient there and sticking to their familiar style of operation: laughing.

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“Jeannie emerged from the MRI machine with a new material telling me, ‘Hey Jim! Write this down,” The Cinco comedy exceptional actor recalls, his voice softening in hindsight.

His wife, who is a Milwaukee native, is also awed. “I inquired with the technicians about what could happen if I shouted inside the room,” she says, “and they said, “Oh, it’s fine. We’re not able to hear you in any case.’”

MRI machines are often small, cramped spaces that make loud, whirring noises that can trigger anxiety in patients suffering from anxiety over claustrophobia. Bederson advised Jeannie to go through an additional seven hours of these and other imaging tests during the days leading up to her surgery. This was to produce what he described as “a 3D virtual representation of her brain.” This “cutting-edge technology, which is augmented reality,” helped him remove this tumor using a level of accuracy “not likely even just a year earlier.”

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Despite their difficult situation, the Gaffigans continued to search for the perfect joke. “That’s how we face life: with humor,” declares Jeannie of her husband and herself with 14 years of marriage. “Fight or flee, and we decided to fight. The fight involved Humor to deal with the tragedy.”

The fans who watched Late Night with Seth Meyers were able to see this in Jim’s latest routine, which is now filled with brain tumor jokes written by the patient herself.

“It was very frightening for a short time,” Jim told Meyers last June, a mere few two weeks after the surgery. His deadpan face and tone reveal nothing. “There were times when I thought, “Oh my God. If something happens to my wife, these five kids are likely to be adopted.”

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Aside from that, Jim is the first to say how utterly devastated he is to be without his loved one. Jim has been known to refer to the woman as the “secret weapon” to help him craft these punch lines, usually drawn from hilarious moments from his family’s life.

It was hard to produce a funny story when reality hit. “I was selfishly hoping for my wife’s health to be fine since I am a lover. However, I was also concerned about my kids. It’s not easy for them to change from super mommy to apathetic dad. There were times that I thought, “Oh. No. It might be. If things got worse, it would be the most important thing for me to ensure the continuity of my children’s lives. I was aware that I could not perform as a comic and be an actor in film,” says Gaffigan, who will next be seen on the screen in the drama Chappaquiddick in April. “When we finally emerged out of the forest, I was ecstatic about Jeannie. Also, it was”OK. I could have lost the entire matter.’”

Jim and his wife are genuine Catholics who aren’t afraid of using the term “miracle” about Jeannie’s 11th-hour diagnosis and her subsequent recovery. Jim claims he’s been forever “changed by the event. The writing that we write has changed. The simple act of talking about it lightheartedly is cathartic for me. However, I believe it’s therapeutic for other people to hear about it. There’s not one person that hasn’t experienced losing, or nearly lost, a significant person in their life.”

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Perseverance Post-Op

Choroid plexus papilloma is a benign and rare cancer that is found in the brain stem, an essential region that governs the flow of signals from the brain to the rest of the body and also essential bodily functions like swallowing and heart rate, consciousness, blood pressure as well as sleepiness as well as breathing.

“The brain stem represents a high-cost property in neurosurgery,” Bederson says. “It’s packed with critical areas.” Patients suffering from Jeannie’s disease typically develop pneumonia; Bederson explains that they have difficulty digesting food and saliva, which is then sucked into the lung. Other signs are “loss of the cranial nerves, speech problems, respiratory depression, inability to balance and move, and painful headaches, debilitating fatigue, and weakness,” These symptoms Jeannie was suffering from.

It’s rare for someone of Jeannie’s age to have this kind of tumor. It is more common among children and is just 2%-4 percent of all tumors that occur in adults. However, what made her growth so impressive, Bederson says, was its “huge” size which immediately suggested that it might not be cancerous yet still damaging.

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After the first scan at her ENT, “I couldn’t believe she could go into my office alone, let alone care for five kids,” he says. That’s why he arranged for immediate treatment for her.

The surgery went as planned. Jeannie posted a photo on Instagram of her hugging one of her sons while lying in her ICU bed and wrote, “I’m still alive!”

Recovery, however, didn’t go quite so smoothly. It juhwas discovered that the brain stem of the author had been subjected to so much compression by this tumor that her capacity to swallow was severely impaired. Following the operation, the night, “I aspirated my saliva and was diagnosed with double lung strep pneumonia,” she says. This forced Bederson to open a tracheotomy of her neck to open her airways. This was followed by introducing an infusion tube into her nasal cavity. She relied on both of them for months while fighting to recover from the illness.

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After stabilizing around two weeks post-surgery, Jeannie returned to her home in the Gaffigans’ Manhattan apartment to recuperate.

“Our young sons dressed as doctors to take care of the patient,” Jim says. “They demonstrated such kindness.” He breaks into tears in talking about the Way family members flew into their home in the Midwest “without any hesitation” and how a myriad of “amazing” acquaintances from every walk of life showed up to assist the children when she started speech and swallowing therapies and other rehabilitation work to improve her brain function as well as body strength and balance.

Jeannie is still struggling with approximately 50% loss in hearing from her left ear. Several months later, it is just now, having graduated from an alcoholic diet. However, “her 60 percent is my 100 percent,” Jim told the San Francisco Chronicle last September of her recovery.

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He reserves his exceptional (comic) reviews for Bederson. “He’s the best.” Jim insists in all seriousness before saying, “I don’t know how they determine who the “best” Brain surgeon is. Perhaps there’s a contest, such as America’s Got Tumors. What’s the reason someone has to be the top brain surgeon? Doesn’t it suffice to be a brain surgeon?”

Bederson is equally enthusiastic about the Gaffigan’s and his most recent patient. Dr. Bederson regards Jeannie’s speedy recovery to be nothing less than astonishing. “Have you had the pleasure of meeting Jeannie?” he asks in awe. “She’s very small, extremely athletic. She’s also a great dancer.”

High-Tech Surgery

Bederson is the director of Mount Sinai’s Neurosurgery Simulation Core, one of the first neuroscience simulation research centers globally. Bederson and his team utilize cutting-edge technology that “creates the equivalent of a GPS of the brain” that allows surgeons to observe — and, most importantly, to avoid vital brain areas by using 3D computerized imaging when they treat tumors. The technology of virtual reality is now accessible at many of the most prestigious medical centers within the U.S., which first entered surgical theatres in 2015. This is how it operates:

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Layered Imaging

“Think of the film Avatar,” Bederson says, “in which we create the virtual reality of a particular scenario based on multiple sources like MRI, CT scan, and an angiogram. We register them and separate the tissues, which means that we color them, make them transparent, and then attach various properties to each type of tissue — the cranial nerves, blood vessels and brain stems, cerebellum, and brain stem. Each tissue is unique in its appearance and is overlayed and integrated [on an electronic screen on a computer screen. It’s a 3-D virtual reality experience, built around [a person’s body and pathology.”

Greater Precision

“We have a device that can tell me where my surgical instruments are concerning the patient’s anatomy,” the doctor declares. “We monitor the movement of the microscope and the location where the center of the instrument is to ensure that the computer is aware of what my eyes are seeing and the direction my looks are focusing.

“If I’m trying to find out the location of the brain stem while treating a tumor, typically, I won’t be able to discern it since it’s in the Way getting in the Way. Now, you can control the simulation. You can look at the edges.” This gives neurosurgeons such as Bederson an increased level of accuracy and safety that was previously hard or even impossible to attain.

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Are you interested in learning more information about HAARP?

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HAARP

Are you interested in learning more information about HAARP? Are you curious about what scientists know about the Ionosphere of Earth, which is the space between Earth’s lower atmosphere and air vacuum?

HAARP The HAARP University of Alaska Fairbanks High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility located in Gakona will hold an open house on the weekend of the 27th of August. The event provides participants with the opportunity of the general public to view the world-class research facility in person and learn more about the scientific questions that the facility is seeking to address. HAARP draws researchers from universities, government as well as the private sector.

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HAARP

A self-guided 90-minute timed entry tour will include the following aspects:

* Control room for HAARP

* History and science exhibits

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The power plant which includes the five generators that were used in the research

* Transmitters as well as The 33-acre array of antennas

* Aircraft surveillance radar

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*Ionosonde is a radar that monitors the health of the Ionosphere

* Radiometer is a device that measures radio frequency in cosmic space.

* Optical equipment domes

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The University of Alaska Fairbanks acquired HAARP’s equipment for research from the Air Force in August 2015 through an agreement for education. HAARP is a part of the UAF Geophysical Institute that operates HAARP through a collaborative arrangement for research and development.

The tour is free. However, the number of tickets available for the open space is restricted. To receive a free ticket, go to the ticketing webpage on HAARP’s website at

The time slots can be accessed at 9 a.m., 10:30 a.m. and 12 p.m., and 1:30 p.m.

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Parking is restricted. Vehicles are limited to a maximum length of 36 feet. The maximum width is 9 feet, and the maximum height of 10 feet.

HAARP can be found at Gakona in Gakona, at the miles 11.3 Tok Cutoff, 26 miles to the north of Glennallen. This is about 135 miles away from Delta Junction.

HAARP users must wear masks inside at all times and outdoors when distances of 6 feet are not maintained.

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Eugenio Derbies turns 61 in a convalescent state after complex surgery | Telemundo News – Telemundo News & More Latest News Here

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Eugenio Derbies turns 61 in a convalescent state after complex surgery | Telemundo News - Telemundo News & More Latest News Here

  1. Eugenio Derbies turns 61 in a convalescent state after complex surgery | Telemundo NewsTelemundo News
  2. Alessandra Rosado calls Eugenio Derbies via video to celebrate her birthdaySensaCine Mexico.
  3. Eugenio Derbies is in recovery from surgery. “He is still sedated,” reveals an assertion Millennium
  4. This is the episode on ‘La Familial Penuche,’ in which Eugenio Derbies & Alessandra Rosado get MARRIED on earth.
  5. Google News has complete coverage.

Latest News Update & All Other News I have tried to provide all types of news to you today, 2022, through this site. You will love all the news because it contains all the news we give. It’s a trending topic, and it has the most recent news.

Eugenio Derbies turns 61 in a convalescent state after complex surgery | Telemundo News - Telemundo News & More Latest News Here

We aim to inform you about the latest news in Electricity News and Degree News. Telemundo News – Telemundo News

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Eugenio Derbies turns 61 in a convalescent state after complex surgery

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The Center of the Universe

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The Center of the Universe

Acoustic anomalies for an unknown reason.

A small concrete circle identifies the so-called CENTER of the INTERNET within downtown Tulsa in the middle of an even more extensive process made of bricks. It’s not much to gaze at, but it’s not all that important.

“The “Center of Space and Time” is a less-known sound phenomenon. If you sit in the center of the circle and make a sound, the sound is echoed many times louder than when it was created. This is your amplifier-powered echo chamber. As the story is told, a foghorn might be sounding at the center of the circle, but those outside won’t be able to hear the sound. This could be a naivete. However, your voice can sound extremely distorting when heard by those outside the circle. It’s an astonishing effect.

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The Center of the Universe

Similar to The Lake George Mystery Spot – another Acoustical Vortex that appears to be defying the laws of Physics. It is believed that the phenomenon could result from sound reflection off the wall’s circular surface and, in this instance, an adjacent planter. Although many have researched the root of this odd phenomenon, there’s still no consensus. Whatever the cause of this natural sonic distortion might be, it’s an incredible place.

Know Before You Go

A brick pathway connects to the walkway, which runs over railroad tracks, accessible via the corner of W. Archer St. and N. Boston Ave. It is located just north of the former Union Train Depot (now the Oklahoma Jazz Hall of Fame) and directly in the direction of Williams Center Tower. Within a few steps of The Center of the Universe is another Tulsa landmark that is that of the “Artificial Cloud” statue.

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